Tag Archive: Costa Rica


Glass Frog

Glass Frog

Glass frog seen in Costa Rica!

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Blue Land Crab

Blue Land Crab

This blue land crab with its asymmetrical claws sits guarding a den 200 yards from a Costa Rican beach. A den such as this requires constant tending to ensure the bottom reaches the underlying water table and fills with 1-2 liters of water, allowing the crab to stay moist. Blue land crabs cannot swim but return to the water, risking drowning, to release fertilized eggs into the salty water after carrying them in a sac on the female’s back for two months. This annual migration follows spring rains as well as the lunar cycle – females release their eggs within two days of a full moon. While the chances of survival for these eggs are minuscule, those that reach adulthood will have undergone 60 molts for their carapace (back) to reach 4.3 inches, and males may see their larger claw reach up to 5.9 inches long!

information from: http://www.sms.si.edu/IRLspec/Cardis_guanhu.htm

Eyelash Pit Viper

Eyelash Pit Viper

Another creature captured in Costa Rica, this eyelash pit viper carries venom in its hinged, hollow fangs. Eyelash vipers have many color variations including brown, red, and yellow like this one, and are named for the scales above their eyes resembling eyelashes and the heat-sensitive pits between their eyes and nostrils that allow them to sense prey. Unlike most other species of snakes, eyelash vipers have rough, not smooth, scales that protect the snake while meandering through its arboreal habitat. These snakes are also ovoviviparous; fertilized eggs develop inside the mother and hatchlings are either born live or immediately after eggs are laid. Interestingly, a single clutch of eggs may contain vipers of every color variation. Eyelash pit vipers were, quite happily, removed from CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) threatened list in 2002.

Golden Silk Orb-Weaver

Golden Silk Orb-Weaver

Golden silk orb-weaver spiders are found all over Costa Rica (they range between the southern United States to Argentina), spinning their webs with golden silk so strong it is used by locals as fishing line and by some hummingbirds as nest material. This particular spider is a female, as the males are five to six times smaller. The golden silk produced by these orb-weavers is currently being tested as a stronger alternative to Kevlar, the fiber used in bullet-proof vests.

Violet Sabrewing

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Yes, another bird! A beautiful hummingbird from Costa Rica.

Orchid Bees

Orchid Bees

Orchid Bees in CATIE’s Botanical Garden, Turrialba, Costa Rica.

Keel-Billed Toucan

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One of the lucky keel-billed toucans we caught in Turrialba, Costa Rica as part of a study determining the toucans’ roles in seed dispersing and reforestation. The bird is definitely uncomfortable in these pictures as we were attaching a radio tag (that was eventually taken off) which allowed us to track its range and find its nest. I believe this one we named Aragorn.

Red-Eyed Tree Frog

Red-Eyed Tree Frog

Red-eyed tree frog near Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica.

Iguana

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Iguana in Manuel Antonio National Park, Costa Rica.

Howler Monkey

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Howler Monkey in Cahuita National Park, Costa RIca